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Saturday, February 17, 2018

The Broad Museum, Part IV

In September 2016, my wife kids and I were in Los Angeles and had time to spend a couple hours at the Broad in Downtown Los Angeles. Here's a link to Part I, Part II and Part III from the past few weeks. Above, Jeff Koons' Tulips. 

The Broad  (rhymes with Road) is a private museum, named after it's benefactors, Eli and Edythe Broad, and opened to the public on September 20, 2015. Admission is free. If you go, we strongly recommend getting reserved tickets, which saves waiting in line to get in.

The expansive third floor gallery, with Jeff Koon's Balloon Dog (Blue) in the distance. 

This is looking back down the escalator, which is one way - taking guest from the first floor entry directly to the third floor. 

There are stairs and elevators to head down to the first floor. On the way down, on  the second floor, we noticed a hand on art studio for kids. 

My kids, at the time 16 and 14, are a bit too old for working on art projects in the museum, but it was still cool to see parents and kids enjoying making projects together. 

The second floor also has a window into the art storage area - with a reminder of just how much artwork The Broad actually has. Only a portion of their collection is on display at any given time. 

"Exit through the gift shop." Yes, there's a gift shop on the first floor towards the exit. 

Another view of gift shop. 

This is looking out through one of the massive glass windows at the outside shell. 

According the the wikipedia article, "the building design is based on a concept entitled "the veil and the vault". "The veil" is a porous envelope that wraps the whole building, filtering and transmitting daylight to the indoor space. This skin is made of 2,500 rhomboidal panels made in fiberglass reinforced concrete supported by a 650-ton steel substructure. "The vault" is a concrete body which forms the core of the building, dedicated to artworks storage, laboratories, curatorial spaces and offices.

Another look at the entry lobby, next to the gift show. You can see the elevator, which goes directly from the first floor up to the third floor. 

Andy Warhol Campbell Soup artwork - on skateboards. These boards are designed to look at, not to ride. 

Last look at the gift shop. Even if you're not a huge fan of modern art, the building alone is worth a trip. 

A final look out front on the street, with a couple of obligatory L.A. food trucks out front. I generally love food trucks, but will admit that they really detract from the look and feel of the building. 

Here's a link to some additional exterior photos of The Broad from a previous post (from an earlier visit). 

Despite the food trucks out front, we wanted to check out the Grand Central Market, a couple of blocks away, which my wife and kids hadn't been to since 2010, before it was "discovered." More on this next time

© 2018


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